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woensdag 5 december 2018

Cycling Australia: the Great Ocean Road of Victoria (travel report)

Cycling Australia: the Great Ocean Road of Victoria
  • from Torquay to Allansford, 243 km in 5 cycling days
    • The Great Ocean Road is a scenic coastal drive that stretches for 243 kilometres across eleven charming townships, rolling farmlands, rugged coastline, forrest areas, sandy beaches, impressive steep cliffs and rock formations.
      • Torquay to Anglesea is a moderate hilly track across rolling farmlands
      • Anglesea to Apollo Bay is a windswept moderately hilly track near the rugged coastline, charming townships and sandy beaches.
      • Apollo Bay to Princetown is largely a strongly hilly track across rolling farmlands and forrest areas with sometimes views on the rugged coastline near Glenaire
      • Princetown to Allansford is a slightly hilly track on a rock platform with worldclass scenic lookouts across rock formations eroded by the sea
  • Scenic lookout along the Great Ocean Road
    • Otway Range
      • Teddy's lookout (Lorne)
      • Lorne scenic beach
      • Mt Defiance
      • Cape Patton (Kennett River)
    • Great Otway National Park
      • Beech forrest
      • Castle Cove (Glenaire)
    • Port Campbell National Park is world famous for its extraordinary collection of wave-sculpted rock formations and the Twelve Apostles.
      • Gibson steps
      • Twelve Apostles (Twelve Apostles Marine National Park)
      • Loch Ard Gorge
      • The Arch
      • London Bridge
  • Alternative roads for bypassing the Great Ocean Road
    • Torquay to Anglesea via Bells Beach for bypassing the rolling farmlands at the start of the scenic drive
    • Glenaire to Lavers Hill via Johanna, where the sea meets the forrest areas at Great Otway National Park
      • cycling facts
        • Cycling distance: 243 kilometres (5 days of cycling) (totally 243 kilometres)
        • Cycling time: 19 hours and 15 minutes (5 days of cycling)
        • Average speed: 12,9 kilometres per hour
        • Elevation: 2303 metres up and 2320 metres down (source: Google Maps)
        • Elevation pitch: 95 m per 10 km up  and 95 m per 10 km down
          

      zaterdag 24 november 2018

      Cycling Australia: Tassie Tour (travel report)

      Cycling Australia: Tassie Tour
      • Great West Tamar Valley & Hinterland  Drive
        • from Longford to Devonport, 158 km in 3 cycling days
          • Vineyard trails in western part of Tamar Valley and its Hinterland. 
      • Great North Eastern Drive
        • from Launceston International Airport to St Helens, 182 km in 4 cycling days
          • Scenic drive along the east coast of Tasmania with stunning views on pristine beaches, rolling farmlands and forestral areas.
      • Great Eastern Drive
        • from St Helens to Triabunna, 172 km in 4 cycling days
      • Great South Eastern Drive
        • from Triabunna via Port Arthur to Richmond, 206 km in 5 cycling days
          • Convict trail from Port Arthur Historic Site to the Tasman National Park, Eaglehawk Neck and historic Richmond, this fascinating journey is rich in convict history and natural beauty. The Tasman Peninsula is a place of breathtaking seascapes, some of the tallest sea cliffs in the world, and wild ocean views.
      • Great Heritage Drive
        • from Richmond to Longford, 168 km in 3 cycling days
          • This part of the Heritage Highway shows the original route between Richmond and Longford, built by convict labour in the early 18th century. Scenic drives through rolling farmlands and charming Georgian townscapes.
          • cycling facts
            • Cycling distance: 886 kilometres (19 days of cycling)
            • Cycling time: 70 hours and 00 minutes
            • Average speed: 12,7 kilometres per hour
            • Elevation: 7773 metres up and 7941 metres down (source: Google Maps)
            • Elevation pitch: 88 m per 10 km up  and 90 m per 10 km down
              

          maandag 19 november 2018

          Cycling Australia: the Great Heritage Drive of Tasmania (travel report)

          Cycling Australia: the Great Heritage Drive of Tasmania
          • from Richmond to Longford, 168 km in 3 cycling days
            • This part of the Heritage Highway shows the original route between Richmond and Longford, built by convict labour in the early 18th century. Scenic drives through rolling farmlands and charming Georgian townscapes.
          • Highlights alongs the Great Heritage Drive
            • Scenic Drive Coal River Valley
              • hilly and greenish farmlands with awesome lookouts on vineyards and sheep farms along the Coal River (regional road B31)
            • Historic town Richmond, with more than 50 Georgian buildings
              • Richmond Bridge, Australia's oldest bridge still in use
              • St John the Evangalist's Church , Australia's oldest Roman Catholic Church
              • St Luke Cemetery, continuous use since the early 19th century
            • Georgian townscape Oatlands with mostly convict-built in the early 1800s 
              • the town has more than 150 sandstone building and offers a complete representation of the architecture, urban design and the cultural heritage of early European settlement in Australia
            • Well preserved riverside village Ross built by convict labour in the early 1800s
              • Ross Bridge with its 186 carvings of high quality by convict stonemasons
              • Female factory shows the way of life of convict women in the early days of Tasmanian settlement as Ross
            • Colonial Farm Villages being part of the Australian Convict Sites World Heritage Property at Longford
              • Brickendon Estate tells the story of the Archer family, assigned convicts, free workers and the beginnings of Australia's pastoral and agricultural industry.
            • cycling facts
              • Cycling distance: 168 kilometres
              • Cycling time: 12 hours and 00 minutes
              • Average speed: 14,0 kilometres per hour
              • Elevation: 940 metres up and 813 metres down (source: Google Maps)
              • Elevation pitch: 58 m per 10 km up  and 50 m per 10 km down